The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer’s model is a unique approach to addressing cancer, co-operating and collaborating across jurisdictions and organizations to optimize the effectiveness and efficiency of cancer control efforts across the continuum. Over a 30-year-span – by 2037 – the Partnership’s goals, shared with its partners, are to reduce the incidence of cancer, lessen the likelihood of Canadians dying from cancer and enhance the quality of life of those living with cancer.

While it is the Partnership’s mandate to implement the national strategy for cancer control, it can do so only with the ongoing collaboration of many organizations across all provinces and territories. These organizations contribute to planning, implementing and evaluating of Partnership-led initiatives that drive the strategy forward. The Partnership’s unique contribution to the cancer landscape is rooted in its collaborative inception and ongoing focused approach. It engages with partners in four key ways:

Four ways we work

To have an impact on a large scale population health challenge as complex and prevalent as cancer, the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer works with Canada’s cancer control community on many different fronts. Together with our strategic priorities and core enabling functions work addresses the full spectrum of cancer control, from prevention to survivorship and palliative and end-of-life care.

Prevention & Screening

Improved access to evidence-based prevention strategies and quality of, and participation in, screening
Accelerating action on cancer prevention and screening

The Partnership collaborates with a broad range of cancer and chronic disease partners to develop high-impact approaches to cancer screening and population-based prevention. Taking action now and sustaining these activities over time means that fewer people will develop cancer in the long term. It also means that Canadians will benefit fully from screening programs designed to limit the impact of breast, cervical and colorectal cancers and in some cases, to prevent cancer from occurring.

Initiatives

The four initiatives advancing this strategic priority are Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention (CLASP), Population-Based Screening Initiative, Healthy Public Policy, and CAREX.

Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention

Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention aims to improve the health of communities and Canadians by bringing together organizations from two or more provinces and territories to form research, practice and policy coalitions to address common risk factors for cancer and other chronic diseases. These coalitions work together to integrate the lessons learned from science with those from practice and policy. CLASP responds to the fact that healthy living and a healthy supportive environment can help to reduce the risk not only of many cancers, but also of other chronic diseases such as diabetes, lung disease and heart disease. Programs and policies that make the healthy choice the easier choice, such as maintaining a healthy body weight or quitting smoking, can encourage healthy living. Policies that integrate health priorities into planning and improve the design of our communities improve the health of Canadians by increasing opportunities for physical activity, access to healthy food, and reducing exposures to environmental carcinogens. Taking action now and sustaining the activities of CLASP into the future means that fewer Canadians will develop cancer in the longer term.

Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention
Population-Based Screening

Checking people for certain cancers before there are any symptoms—cancer screening—saves lives. The challenge is to make sure the right people get the right tests at the right times and that the screening programs continue to be of the highest possible quality. Ensuring high-quality follow-up of people’s test results is also central to our work to support early diagnosis.

To meet these complex challenges, key provincial players in cancer screening are brought together from across the country. Together, we focus on strengthening existing screening programs that are proven to save lives and consider the implications of new research and practice evidence. We pinpoint where improvements are needed through information exchange, sharing of best practices and regular reporting and analysis of data related to quality.

The Partnership is maximizing the benefits of population-based screening through focused actions in breast, cervical and colorectal screening. In addition, the Partnership continues to assess emerging areas of screening and responded quickly to new evidence suggesting lung cancer screening may be appropriate for a high-risk population. Three large-scale programs of work are central to the initiative:

  • National networks that promote active engagement across the country and connect stakeholders for each of the four focus areas, (breast, cervical, colorectal and lung)
  • Screening program evaluation activities that enable regular reporting and analysis of quality indicators
  • Quality improvement opportunities identified through the screening program evaluation work
Population-Based Screening
Healthy Public Policy

The Healthy Public Policy Initiative is centred on the Prevention Policies Directory created in the Partnership’s first mandate. The directory brings together cancer and chronic disease prevention policies from hundreds of Canadian sources in a searchable online tool. It supports public health professionals, academic researchers and policy specialists working to create healthier communities through evidence-informed policy development. Over 1,500 policies have been published in the Prevention Policies Directory to-date.

Healthy Public Policy
CAREX

Funded by the Partnership, CAREX Canada provides national, provincial and territorial occupational and environmental carcinogen exposure surveillance information and tools. CAREX Canada has completed national indicators for environmental exposures for 28 substances. As part of the National Occupational and Environmental Carcinogens Surveillance Initiative, CAREX has also produced reports on occupational exposures for 44 high-priority known and suspected carcinogens or relevant groupings.

CAREX

 

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to cancer prevention?
  • 10 year outlook: Canadians have improved access to proven ways to prevent cancer and more people will be getting checked and finding cancer earlier.
  • 20 year outlook: People change the way they live and work to reduce their risk of developing cancer, such as increased fruit and vegetable consumption, increased levels of physical activity, and avoiding exposure of carcinogens and reduction in smoking prevalence.
  • 30 year outlook: Canadians are less likely to develop cancer and related chronic diseases.
What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to cancer screening?
  • 10 year outlook: More people who would benefit from screening are participating in screening programs, the programs are of even higher quality and there is an evidence-based approach to addressing cervical cancer screening among women vaccinated for human papillomavirus (HPV). Over time, this means Canadians will benefit fully from screening programs designed to limit the impact of breast, cervical and colorectal cancers.
  • 20 year outlook: A greater proportion of cancers are diagnosed earlier, so they can be treated sooner, with better results.
  • 30 year outlook: Many cancers are prevented. Fewer Canadians die from cancer as a result of early diagnosis, and treatment is less life-altering.

Diagnosis & Clinical Care

More consistent actions to enhance quality of diagnosis and clinical care
Advancing acceleration on cancer diagnosis and care

Canadians deserve the highest quality of health care services, including excellence in cancer care. By working with the health care community to translate data, evidence and best practices into action, the Partnership helps advance high-quality diagnosis and clinical care for all of us.

The Partnership places a major emphasis on applying the information available through system performance analysis and reporting. This information helps us work with partners responsible for care delivery, including practitioners, to assess system level quality successes and gaps that may benefit from national action.

Initiatives

The initiatives advancing this strategic priority are the Synoptic Reporting Initiative, Enhancing Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials, and the Quality Implementation Initiative.

Synoptic Reporting Initiative

Surgery and testing of related tissue samples (pathology) yield a large amount of information about a patient’s cancer that is used to guide treatment. Combined with data from a large group of patients, this information can also help professionals in the cancer system to plan their work and measure its effectiveness. Implementing synoptic pathology reporting tools helps to expand the adoption of pathology standards and guidelines and drive practice improvements across the cancer care continuum. For either purpose, patient information needs to be gathered quickly, accurately and in high-quality, standardized formats. There is a growing movement to do this through an approach called synoptic reporting, which uses structured templates and checklists to gather and report information. This is a major change from the traditional practice of dictating narrative reports.

The Synoptic Reporting Initiative is supporting the expansion of synoptic surgery and pathology reporting in multiple jurisdictions across Canada. A key to these reporting systems is that they seamlessly integrate guidelines and evidence-based best practices. The result is safer surgical care and more effective treatment. Reporting standards also ensure that better data is made available to cancer registries, which record data the cancer control community uses to shape many aspects of its work.

Synoptic Reporting Initiative

 

Enhancing Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are a key step in evaluating new approaches to cancer treatment, palliation and support that lead to improved patient outcomes, including increased survival and improved quality of life., The Partnership is investing in a pan-Canadian approach to strengthen Canada’s ability to conduct practice-changing clinical trials and improve cancer outcomes for Canadians. With funding from the Partnership, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) is developing and implementing the Coordinating Centre for the Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials Network.

Enhancing Canadian Cancer Clinical Trials

 

Quality Implementation Initiative

The Quality Implementation Initiative uses evidence and system performance measures to inform coordinated action to enhance quality in patient care. The goal of the initiative is to build on the foundation laid in the first mandate to leverage a national approach to identifying gaps in quality, synthesize the evidence about the gaps and identify potential quality initiatives. The Partnership is working with the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy (CPQR) to promote the gathering of evidence in radiotherapy quality assurance, and with the Quality Initiative in Interpretive Pathology (QIIP) to develop and implement a national framework. The Partnership is also supporting four multi-jurisdictional projects to implement quality initiatives across Canada.

Quality Implementation Initiative

 

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to cancer diagnosis and clinical care?
  • 10 year outlook: A more consistent approach is being taken to improving the quality of cancer diagnosis and care and to enhance Canadians’ ability to participate in clinical trials.
  • 20 year outlook: Patient information is gathered more quickly, accurately and in high-quality, standardized formats across Canada. Information about patients’ cancers is helping professionals in the cancer system to plan their work and measure its effectiveness.
  • 30 year outlook: Canadians are receiving more effective treatment for their cancers and more consistent, efficient and higher quality reporting is improving patient care.

Person-centred perspective

Improved capacity to respond to patient needs.
Accelerating action on responsiveness to patient needs.

Embedding the person-centred perspective in the health care system requires an approach to cancer care that is responsive to a patient’s preferences, and considers each patient’s emotional, psychological, spiritual and practical needs. To do this, it is important to hear directly from people who are dealing with cancer and the health care system. It is only by engaging patients, caregivers and families that the patient experience can be improved.

The Partnership is working with patients, health system leaders, and health care providers to improve the patient and family experience along the various phases of the cancer journey, from diagnosis, through treatment to survivorship or palliative and end-of-life care. Investments have been made in fourteen person-centred care projects across the country that are working in the areas of patient experience and patient reported outcomes, primary and cancer care integration, survivorship, and palliative and end-of-life care.

The Partnership is committed to exploring, with partners across Canada, the most effective ways to embed a person-centred perspective throughout the cancer journey.

Initiatives

The initiatives advancing this strategic priority are Patient Experience and Patient Reported Outcomes, Primary Care and Cancer Care Integration, Survivorship and Palliative and End-of-Life Care.

Patient Experience and Patient Reported Outcomes Initiative

A hallmark of quality cancer care is the provision of person-centred care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patients’ preferences, needs and values. The goal of the Patient Experience and Outcomes Initiative is to improve the patient experience across the cancer journey through standardized measurement that accelerates optimal care and measures impact (health-related outcomes for patients) across Canada. The aim is for all  participating jurisdictions to establish a measurement and reporting cycle for patient experience that facilitates action to guide improvement through use of standardized screening and assessment tools and implementation of programmatic interventions.

Patient Experience and Patient Reported Outcomes Initiative

 

Primary Care and Cancer Care Integration Initiative

Demand for cancer and chronic disease health care services are increasing due to the growing and aging population. With advances in cancer screening and treatment, more people are living with a diagnosis of cancer for longer periods of time. While this is a good thing, it can also be a challenge. The need to maximize the quality of cancer and chronic disease care while ensuring long-term sustainability of provincially-based health care systems is essential. Created in collaboration with the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Canadian Association of Provincial Cancer Agencies, the goal of the Primary and Cancer Care Integration Initiative is to investigate leading practices that improve transitions of care between cancer specialists and primary care settings, and ultimately improve the patient experience, and enhance the efficiency and the quality of care of the primary care and cancer care systems. The focus of these projects is after primary cancer treatment is complete and follow-up care has begun.

Primary Care and Cancer Care Integration Initiative

 

Palliative and End-of-Life Care Initiative

Given that many patients will still eventually die from their cancer, it is important to consider palliative and end-of-life care as an integral part of a cancer control strategy. The Palliative and End-of-Life Care Initiative supports multi-jurisdictional efforts aimed at improvements in professional education, early introduction of palliative and end-of-life care, system integration, incorporation of patients’ and families’ expressed wishes for place of death, advanced care planning, improvement in rural and remote access, and First Nations, Inuit and Métis engagement.

Palliative and End-of-Life Care Initiative

 

Survivorship Initiative

In Canada, there are currently more than a million people living as cancer survivors. With further advances in prevention, screening and treatment, as well as the expected increase in the number of cancer diagnoses, the total number of cancer survivors is expected to increase in the future (Canadian Cancer Statistics, 2008). The Canadian health care system will see a higher number of people living with survivorship issues. It is therefore critical to understand the unique needs of this growing population. In the Partnership’s first mandate, The Cancer Journey Action Group identified the development of improved approaches to cancer survivorship as a key priority.

Survivorship Initiative

 

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to embedding the person-centred perspective in the health care system?
  • 10 year outlook: Patient outcomes are improved through agreement on and collection of common indicators and measures. In addition, a shared set of evidence-informed assessment tools and resources are supporting person-centred program design and implementation.
  • 20 year outlook: The cancer control system is enhanced and synergies have been developed with the broader health system, contributing to an improved experience for cancer patients and their families.
  • 30 year outlook: The quality of life of Canadians who are affected by cancer has improved.

Research

Enhanced coordination of cancer research and improved population research capacity.
Accelerating action on cancer research.

Research is critical to the continued enhancement of our understanding of cancer and related chronic diseases, providing insights and applications that will enhance prevention, treatment and quality of life. The Partnership is enabling targeted research into cancer and related chronic diseases and working with a broad range of partners to enhance research coordination and improve population research capacity.

Initiatives

The two initiatives advancing this strategic priority are the Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) and the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (CCRA).

Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project

The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project is a long-term initiative involving more than 300,000 Canadians, ages 35 to 69, who agree to share their health and lifestyle information over their adult lives. By analyzing and comparing the data collected through this project, researchers can explore and better understand regional, national and international patterns and trends and find the answers to questions about the causes of cancer and related chronic diseases. These studies will also help to confirm whether emerging international evidence and information is applicable to Canada’s population. The project is currently made up of five regional studies: the BC Generations Project, Alberta’s Tomorrow Project, the Ontario Health Study, Quebec’s CARTaGENE and Atlantic PATH.

Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow

Canadian Cancer Research Alliance

An efficiently functioning system for cancer research funding requires a coordinated approach that maximizes opportunities for collaboration and helps to reduce duplication. This, in turn, will magnify the impact of research investments across the country. To this end, the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (CCRA) brings together organizations that collectively fund most of the cancer research conducted in Canada. Members include federal research funding programs and agencies, provincial research agencies, cancer charities and other voluntary associations. The Alliance fosters the development of partnerships among cancer research funding agencies in Canada, promotes the development of national cancer research priorities and strategies, and reports to donors and the public on the nature and impact of the investment in cancer research funding in Canada. The Executive Office of the CCRA is supported by the Partnership and the Partnership is a CCRA member organization.

Canadian Cancer Research Alliance

 

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to research on cancer and related chronic diseases?
  • 10 year outlook: The Canadian Partnership for Tomorrow Project (CPTP) is the largest population health research initiative of its kind in Canada and has recruited more than 300,000 participants across the country, which will allow Canadian researchers to answer research questions that could not be addressed in the past. Data from across the regional cohorts has been harmonized and the CPTP data platform is available to national and international researchers.
  • 20 year outlook: Canadians have a better understanding about the risk factors for chronic diseases based on new research findings drawn from the project’s data and are changing the way they live and work to prevent their risk of developing a chronic disease. Canadian researchers are actively using data from the project and population health research is strengthened by access to this population laboratory.
  • 30 year outlook: Canadians are less likely to develop cancer and related chronic diseases.

 

First Nations, Inuit & Métis

Improved First Nations, Inuit and Métis cancer control with and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and partners.
Accelerating action on cancer control with and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and partners.

First Peoples experience a disproportionate burden of disease and some regional studies have indicated that cancer rates are increasing among First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples compared to the general population. There is a growing need for culturally relevant and safe services. Furthermore, the cancer experience for First Peoples is often complex: access to care is limited by geography, transportation and the availability of culturally relevant and safe care. Screening, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship and end-of-life care may take patients and families through a complicated circuit of services outside their community to access care.

Applying a peoples-specific approach, the Partnership advances the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control by working with and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis partners and health and cancer control systems. The portfolio is focused on addressing the priority cancer control gaps, including those related to cancer and chronic disease prevention, described in the Action Plan and as identified by each of the three peoples and by the health systems serving them. Four strategic areas of focus are:

  • Community-based health human resource skills and capacity
  • Community awareness, culturally responsive resources and services
  • Access to programs and services in remote and rural communities
  • Patient identification systems

The initative will facilitate health systems collaboration on social determinants of health and the uptake of evidence to action while raising the profile of cancer among First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership.

Initiatives

The initiative advancing this strategic priority is the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control Initiative.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control Initiative

The First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control Initiative supports jurisdictions to advance the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Action Plan on Cancer Control.

The desired outcomes of the initiative include:

  • Improved knowledge of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis patient’s experience through the cancer journey;
  • Referral of First Nations, Inuit and Métis patients to culturally relevant and safe cancer care navigation and traditional supports;
  • Delivery of cancer diagnosis in a culturally and emotionally safe way. First Nations, Inuit and Métis patients have appropriate supports at the diagnosis appointment, traditional supports are considered, and relevant resources are made available;
  • Improved transfer of care for First Nations, Inuit and Métis patients who return to home communities from secondary/tertiary care centres over the course of their cancer care;
  • An increase in the number of jurisdictions with specific actions to address cancer control for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples; and
  • Improved access to resources and acceleration of progress as a result of a pan-Canadian collaborative approach. Common tools, resources and networks will be developed.

These outcomes will be milestones in ongoing, collaborative, long-term efforts to address chronic diseases, including cancer, with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and health and cancer system partners.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis Cancer Control Initiative

 

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to cancer control with and for First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and partners?
  • 10 year outlook: Working with partners, First Nations, Inuit and Métis people are having their unique needs for cancer prevention and care better recognized and addressed.
  • 20 year outlook: First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples have their needs for cancer prevention and care better recognized and addressed by health and cancer system partners. Cancer diagnosis is delivered in a culturally and emotionally safe way and First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples are referred to culturally relevant and safe cancer care navigation and traditional supports.
  • 30 year outlook: First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples are less likely to develop cancer and more likely to experience better care and outcomes.

System performance

Improved analysis and reporting on cancer system performance.
Accelerating better decision making through better data.

The Partnership engages in collaborative efforts with provincial and national partners to identify aspects of the cancer control system that need to be measured, define performance indicators, collect valid and comparable data and report findings. This is completed in an integrated manner that allows for synthesis of results and interpretation of patterns to inform quality improvement strategies. Findings are published in a series of reports targeting the cancer control community, especially provincial cancer agencies, provincial departments/ministries of health, clinicians, researchers and cancer patients and their families. The performance indicators are intended to aid policy-makers and health planners in identifying best practices and opportunities for quality improvements in cancer control across Canada.

The Partnership also works with national and provincial partners and knowledge leaders to set evidence-based targets and benchmarks for a number of performance indicators. Targets help identify the magnitude and directionality of performance improvement efforts and opportunities, which informs the implementation of quality improvement initiatives at the local or national levels.

Initiatives

The initiative advancing this priority is the System Performance Initiative.

System Performance Initiative

Investments have been made to ensure that Canadians have better information about how well the cancer system is working, and professionals in the health system are using this information to drive improvement. Canada is now able to review and compare performance across the country using over 30 indicators spanning eight domains: prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, long-term outcomes, person-centred perspective, research, and system efficiency. The performance indicators are intended to aid policy-makers and health planners in identifying best practices and opportunities to target quality improvements in cancer control across Canada.

In addition the initiative also conducts in-depth studies to shed light on areas of cancer control that are unmeasured or under-measured.

Launched in June 2014, a new system performance web application is providing users with more user-friendly and customizable access to system performance results, including downloadable content. Through a variety of system performance indicators and provincial comparisons, the web app helps identify areas of cancer control across Canada that are doing well, and those requiring further improvement. This in turn helps inform opportunities for further research and analysis at the provincial, regional and local levels.

System Performance Initiative

 

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to cancer system performance reporting?
  • 10 year outlook: The quality of cancer control and delivery is improved through better measurement of how the system is performing.
  • 20 year outlook: Common performance targets are set. It’s easier for jurisdictions providing care to make informed decisions about where to focus to have the greatest impact on Canadians in such areas as cancer prevention, early detection and care.
  • 30 year outlook: A culture of continuous improvement exists across the cancer system, and cancer patients experience better care and outcomes.

Knowledge Management

Enhanced access to high-quality information, tools and resources.
Accelerating access to high-quality information, tools and resources.

Knowledge management– moving evidence into practice – is central to the mandate of the Partnership. We do this by creating platforms, tools and pan-Canadian networks and forums to help the cancer community access the knowledge and resources it needs to support evidence-informed decision-making. Routinely measuring the extent and impact of our knowledge mobilization activities is critical to supporting the overall strategy. The portfolio of work includes the Partnership’s online hub for cancer evidence, policy and practices, cancerview.ca; tools to support the synthesis, interpretation and use of evidence such as the cancer risk management modelling platform; and analytic capacity building to support greater coordination in the use of cancer control data to inform policy, planning and system performance reporting.

Initiatives

The initiatives advancing this priority are Cancerview.ca, Cancer Risk Management Model; the Analytic Capacity Building and Coordinated Data Development Initiative; Evidence, Synthesis and Guidelines; and Knowledge Transfer and Adoption.

Cancerview.ca

Launched in 2009, cancerview.ca is a knowledge hub and online community that offers trusted, evidence-based content and a wide array of tools and resources. It provides specialized platforms that support planning and collaboration in cancer control across jurisdictions to guide decision-making at the clinical, management and policy levels. The website also provides professionals working in cancer control with timely access to trusted information and evidence from a variety of partner organizations across Canada. As a platform for virtual collaboration, it allows experts and colleagues from across Canada to easily connect and work together regardless of their geographic location.

Cancerview.ca

 

Cancer Risk Management Model

The Cancer Risk Management Model platform draws on population-based data sources to provide health and economic cancer projections via a web-based platform. The model was developed by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer in collaboration with Statistics Canada and teams of clinicians, health economists and other experts. It is in keeping with the Partnership’s mandate to drive system-wide improvements through the synthesis and dissemination of the best available information. The model allows users to project health and economic outcomes of various interventions – whether in prevention, screening, or a new therapy – that would ordinarily take years to realize.

Cancer Risk Management Model

 

Evidence, Synthesis and Guidelines

The body of evidence to inform clinical and policy decisions is rapidly expanding. The Evidence, Synthesis and Guidelines Initiative builds on the Partnership’s earlier work to enable stakeholders to use evidence in practice through knowledge syntheses, resources and toolkits for action. The aim of this opportunity is to:

  • Facilitate access to evidence syntheses and other knowledge products to support both efforts to advance the cancer strategy and those working in cancer control broadly
  • Develop models of collaboration with partners to provide an evidence synthesis function
  • Provide supports, such as training, tools and resources, to foster evidence-informed practice within the Partnership and the cancer control community.
Analytic Capacity Building and Coordinated Data Development Initiative

The Analytic Capacity Building and Coordinated Data Development Initiative was launched in 2013/14 to identify and fill key data gaps and to support analytic capacity within Canada. The objectives of this initiative are twofold: to enhance and create new capacity to support analysis and use of evidence to improve the cancer system, and to enable consistent pan-Canadian reporting related to cancer treatment.

The Analytic Capacity Building stream of work is increasing training for both cancer data analysts and cancer data coders, building a pan-Canadian analytic network and increasing the supply of cancer-data trained analysts.

The Coordinated Data Development Initiative aims to identify a core set of treatment data elements, seek provincial alignment to common data definitions, test the feasibility of obtaining treatment data or creating linked data sets. After a call for Expressions of Interest, 6 pilot projects have been funded for planning. All projects focus specifically on addressing gaps in the availability of, or access to, one or more types of treatment data.

Analytic Capacity Building and Coordinated Data Development Initiative
Knowledge Transfer and Adoption

The Knowledge Transfer and Adoption Initiative supports the coordination of the Partnership’s approaches to knowledge transfer, exchange and adoption across the cancer control strategy. It includes the creation of toolkits, resources and evaluation instruments to help Partnership initiatives measure their impact from a knowledge management perspective.

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to connecting evidence to practice?
  • 10 year outlook: Patients and professionals have more timely and easier access to evidence-based information, tools and resources about cancer.
  • 20 year outlook: Health professionals are using information, tools and resources for evidence-informed decision-making. Patients are better informed about information and resources to help them in their cancer journey.
  • 30 year outlook: Canadians are learning from one another and working together to put evidence into practice.

Public Engagement & Outreach

Enhanced public and patient awareness and engagement.
Accelerating action on patient and public engagement in the national cancer strategy.

Engaging with and reaching out to Canadians with cancer, their caregivers and families is extremely important in shaping Canada’s cancer strategy and ensuring that it meets its ultimate goals.

Our intention is that patients, survivors, caregivers and families will bring their voices and experiences to issues linked to the immediate outcomes and ultimate goals of the national cancer control strategy. We will help make this happen, in part, by working with individual patients, survivors and families and a wide range of patient organizations and groups. This includes the Canadian Cancer Action Network (CCAN), which brings together more than 90 patient groups, as well as the national, provincial and territorial agencies and organizations working in cancer and related chronic diseases including the Canadian Cancer Society.

Initiatives

The initiative advancing this priority is the Public Engagement and Outreach Initiative.

Public Engagement and Outreach Initiative

Embedding the patient voice plays an important strategic role in driving progress towards the immediate, intermediate and ultimate goals of the national cancer strategy.

Key principles of the Public Engagement and Outreach Initiative are as follows:

  • Ensuring that patient perspectives are captured to inform system design and direct our efforts.
  • Using integrated approaches across multiple communications channels and platforms to reflect the collective efforts of our work with partners and our progress toward our shared goals in cancer control.
  • Building on existing partnerships and seeking innovative opportunities to expand our reach and impact.

The Partnership launched its integrated Public Engagement and Outreach Initiative to further strengthen engagement with professional audiences, the patient community as well as the general public.

What is the impact of a national, collaborative approach to awareness about the national cancer strategy?
  • 10 year outlook: People affected by, or with an interest in, cancer have more opportunities to be involved with the national cancer strategy by shaping the collaborative work taking place to advance cancer control priorities. The Partnership and its partners are communicating the benefits of the national cancer strategy to Canadians affected by cancer and the outcomes of the work are measured and publicly available.
  • 20 year outlook: Pan-Canadian groups, patients, survivors and caregivers are engaged in integrated and collaborative approaches to public engagement and outreach that are accelerating the results of the long-term outcomes of the national cancer strategy and reducing the burden of cancer on Canadians.
  • 30 year outlook: Canadians are actively engaged in helping to reduce the incidence of cancer, lessen the likelihood of dying from cancer, and enhancing the quality of life of those affected by cancer.