Pan-Canadian Cancer Research Strategy

Pan-Canadian Cancer Research Strategy

The Partnership’s second five-year mandate and the next phase of implementing Canada’s national cancer strategy began in April 2012. The priorities and initiatives for 2012-2017 are outlined in our strategic plan, Sustaining Action Toward a Shared Vision and in the Priorities section of our website. The information below reflects work to the end of March 2012.  

Planning and co-ordinating cancer research efforts for maximum impact

Many questions about cancer remain unanswered, but there are more ideas for addressing those questions than there are dollars to support the research. Understanding the cancer research landscape, as well as gaps and opportunities, is critical to optimizing research investments and using limited funds most effectively.

The Pan-Canadian Cancer Research Strategy was developed by the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (CCRA), a co-ordinated pan-Canadian voice for cancer research. It was published in June 2010 and represents the collaboration of 31 major cancer research organizations. For the first time, Canada’s cancer research funders are planning how elements of their work will fit within the context of a broader national strategy, taking into consideration shared priorities and leveraging the strengths of each organization to maximize available funds. This commitment to a co-ordinated plan by the cancer research community marks an important shift in culture. The landmark research strategy recommends 24 key action items across numerous areas of focus, including prevention, biological and translational research and treatment, as well as survivorship. As the strategy is implemented, existing partnerships will continue to strengthen and new collaborations will form to integrate valuable knowledge and optimize cancer research across the country.

Results for 2011/12:

  • The CCRA held the first-ever Canadian Cancer Research Conference in November 2011. Nearly 1,000 people attended this landmark event. Co-funded by the Partnership and 18 other organizations, the conference showcased research efforts in Canada, connecting researchers with the public to report on the impact of Canada’s cancer research investment, and connecting funding agencies with their research communities. The conference attracted more than 550 abstracts and featured more than 35 plenary, symposium and poster sessions. In addition, nearly 150 people attended the conference’s Community Forum, which provided an opportunity for volunteers, donors, staff and the public to meet leading researchers and learn about the accomplishments of Canada’s cancer research efforts.
  • The CCRA released its annual Cancer Research Investment in Canada report, focusing this year on investments in survivorship as well as palliative and end-of-life care. Downloaded more than 9,200 times since its release in September 2011, the report enables the cancer community to identify gaps in funding and prioritize to better address the needs of patients, caregivers and survivors.

For more information on this initiative’s results leading up to 2012 and how the work supports the overall cancer control strategy, please read Key Achievements 2007-2012 and see our annual reports and progress reports